1974 Mustang

Often reviled by Mustang enthusiasts, called the “Pintang” or worse, the Mustang II arrived in 1974 as a re-born Mustang. The goal set forth by Lee Iacocca was to reclaim the original mission of the Mustang as a small, fun to drive , inexpensive personal car. He did achieve this goal, although the Mustang faithful turned their backs.

The Mustang II indeed shared it’s soul with the equally reviled Ford Pinto. It rode on a stretched version of the Pinto chassis but had a number of considerable improvements for ride and handling. A front suspension sub frame isolated road noise and vibrations which combined with the new rack and pinion steering offered surprisingly favorable handling characteristics. Longer leaf springs in the rear and the longer wheelbase also gave the Mustang II a much better ride than the Pinto.

Under the hood was Ford’s first American built four cylinder engine since 1934, the 2.3 liter OHC iron block power plant that continues to be built today in an evolved form to power the Ranger pickups. The engine wheezed out a meager 88 hp. Optional was the German built 2.8 liter Cologne V6. This larger version of the V6 that powered the German built Mercury Capri provided 105 hp, but still only provided 0-60 times of about 13.8 seconds – a joke by today’s standards. No V8 was available for the first time in Mustang’s history.


Body styling was at given a “so-so” reaction at the time. Available in a notchback coupe or hatchback configuration it had many Pinto overtones, though it shared only a few drivetrain and chassis components. The interior was lauded at the time as a study in luxury, offering many upscale design touched and trim treatments. Lee Iacocca had called the car his “little limousine” and the term stuck.

From a sales standpoint the car bombed in the showrooms for the first couple months. Car magazines universally gave the car an under whelming reception. Things were looking bleak for the new car until the gas crisis on 1973 hit. Within months, the sales of Mustang II’s were soaring as was the sticker price. Many say that had it not been for the oil crisis, the Mustang II would have been a complete failure.

In hindsight, the Mustang II was the right car for the times. Ford was not the only manufacturer to deprive customers of excitement during the 1970’s. Even so, the Mustang hobby has been slow to accept the Mustang II as a classic, though you shouldn’t tell proud owners of these cars of this. The Mustang II has been cultivating a solid following of owners that are dedicated to preserving this part of Mustang’s history.

1974 Mustang Production Data:

69F Hatchback: 74,799

69R Hatchback – Mach 1: 44,046

60F Coupe: 177,671

60H Coupe – Ghia: 89,477

Total Production: 385,993

1974 Mustang Specifications:

1974 Mustang Engines

2.3 L – 140 cid, I-4, 2bbl, 88 hp

2.8 L – 171 cid, V6, 2bbl, 105 hp

Code

Y

Z


Transmissions

4-speed manual

3-speed automatic (C4)


Brakes

Power front disc brakes / rear drum


Body Styles

Coupe

Coupe – Ghia

Hatchback

Hatchback – Mach 1

Code

60F

60H

69F

69R


Dimensions

Curb weight – 4 cyl coupe

Curb weight -4 cyl hatchback

Length

Height

Wheelbase

2,660 lb

2,807 lb

175″

49.6″

96.2″


Assembly Plant

Dearborn, MI

San Jose, CA

Code

F

R

1974 Mustang Colors:

Exterior Colors

Medium Yellow Gold

Medium Lime Yellow

Light Blue

Dark Red

Bright Red

Pearl White

Green Glow

Ginger Glow

Tan Glow

Metallic Bright Green Gold

Metallic Saddle Bronze

Medium Metallic Bright Blue

Medium Metallic Copper

Metallic Silver

Code

6C

4W

3B

2M

2B

9C

4T

5J

5U

4B

5T

3N

5M

1G


Interior Colors:

Black

Blue

Red

Tan

Silver

Avocado

Tan/White

Red/White

Blue/White

A

B

D

U

P

G

M

N

Q

About the author

TMN Staff

Staff posted articles include excerpts or entire content from official company press releases, company statements and other news content which comes to us from various sources.